Homework Market Me

Homework Market Me – Then the president would give acts of appointment of new heads of the Ministry of resignations and so far, who have won elections to the European Parliament.

Poles should be given the possibility of visa-free entry to the USA.zobacz Mike Pence for Donald Trump. US Vice President will deliver a speech at Pilsudski Square »” Anyone who she was going to the USA, please, to continue these proposals consisted, because it will help this normal, lawful entry (Polish – PAP) into the system (visa-free – PAP) “- said the head of the president’s cabinet . Szczerski stressed that relations with the US is important not only to visa-free travel. “The idea was for all these years, to sign with the US bilateral agreements on cooperation in the field of secure borders, exchange of information and it is only now done. It is only this team (PiS government – PAP) and the president of the agreements signed and ratified ” – He said. “For many years there were many barriers (in relations with the US – PAP), and we all of them systematically removed the good relations,” – he added. Head of Cabinet of the President also spoke about the agreement between the Polish and the US concerning the permanent presence of US troops – in place of the current rotational presence. He admitted that this agreement was to be signed during your stay in Poland, the US president Donald Trump, during the celebration of 80 anniversary of the outbreak of World War II, last weekend. President Trump, however, postponed their arrival, due to the expected hurricane in the US Dorian.zobacz also Szczerski resigns to run for EU Commissioner »Szczerski stressed that the agreement is re

Ahmed ZaidiHomework Market Me – Then the president would give acts of appointment of new heads of the Ministry of resignations and so far, who have won elections to the European Parliament.
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Homework Helper – The Toronto Homework Policy After Two Years: One Parent’s Perspective (part 2)

The Toronto Homework Policy After Two Years: One Parent’s Perspective (part 2)

Before I attempt to answer the question, ‘why two years later am I complaining about my children’s homework?’ I should note that many parents I’ve spoken to have indeed noticed a decrease in their children’s homework. But my experience and that of other French immersion parents I’ve consulted has been that teachers continue to assign homework inconsistent with the new policy.

Grade 4 French Immersion
On curriculum night in September 2008, the Grade 4 teacher warned parents to expect a difficult year. She explained that the nature of ‘mid-immersion’ its compression compared to immersion programs starting in Kindergarten made it necessary to work the children particularly hard. (There was scant mention of the new homework policy, no hint that the program might have to be adjusted in order to comply with it.)

She was not kidding. On a nightly basis, students were expected to review

copious notes from class, practice spelling words, complete math and grammar sheets, and study for tests (two per week). In addition, there were projects to be completed outside of class. Although my daughters loved learning in French and their grades remained strong, they were unaccustomed to a such a heavy workload. They began to show signs of stress (read, meltdowns) almost immediately. By Christmas, they were proclaiming their hatred for school; I prepared to pull them out of French immersion. After the holidays, homework eased up marginally, but enough to convince me I would not be irreparably harming my daughters by keeping them in the program.

Grade 5 French Immersion
Grade five was initially better. On curriculum night, the teacher professed her dislike of homework; as a parent herself, she understood how busy today’s children are. Yet this teacher is renowned within the school as a kind of project queen. Every year, her students (or their parents) produce extraordinary projects in science and social studies, which are displayed on designated days to the other students and teachers in the school. And sure enough, it was the projects spaced inconsistently and piled on top of regular homework that nearly did us in. Three of them were clumped together in the space of five weeks in the spring term when, as my daughter put it, kids have ‘had it with the torture of school.’ To be fair, the teacher allocated class time to the projects, but often project time encroached on core subjects such as math and grammar, so more homework came home in those subjects. Moreover, class time was not allocated to the building of temples or eyeballs or machines; parents were responsible for supplying materials, and were expected to provide space and time at home for their children to complete all of the arts and crafts components. As a result, my daughters had little choice but to spend multiple weekends including ‘days of significance’ and holidays, such as Passover, Easter, Mother’s Day and Victoria Day working on various elements of assigned projects.

Contradiction Between Policy and Practice
Frustrated and confused by the contradiction between the new policy and the homework we were experiencing, I decided to do a little investigating. I asked several people the principal of my daughters’ school, the superintendent of our particular school district, and my local school Trustee a simple question: Is the homework policy a set of voluntary guidelines, or is it binding? The answer, it turns out, is not simple. Howard Goodman, school Trustee for my area, summed up the confusion when he answered: ‘somewhere in between.’ Both he and John Chasty, the area Superintendent, insisted that schools are expected to comply with the new policy, and that responsibility for implementation lies with principals and teachers. However, as Goodman reminded me in an email, the TDSB is ‘a highly decentralized organization which works hard to be responsive to . . . local conditions.’ In other words, the board tolerates a certain latitude in the interpretation of its policies in order to empower schools and teachers to respond flexibly to the needs of students.

I began to wonder whether the TDSB counts French immersion along with other enrichment programs such as gifted classes as a local condition necessitating a ‘liberal’ interpretation of the homework policy. Not so, according to Lyn Gaetz, principal of my daughters’ school. The new recommendations, Gaetz told me, were well received by teachers at the school. She explained that she meets with the teaching staff yearly to discuss the policy and to monitor its implementation. No program is exempt, but Gaetz did acknowledge the challenges the school has faced reducing homework in French immersion.

My sense from talking to teaching staff is that most of them French-immersion teachers included believe they are complying with the new policy. And returning to the document itself, I see how this belief is enabled by a discernible vagueness of wording. For example, in reference to the early elementary years, the policy notes the ‘strong connection between reading to or with elementary children every day . . . and student achievement’ and goes on to encourage regular reading at home, among other family activities. One would be hard pressed to object to such a recommendation, but its lack of specificity allows for some bizarre interpretations. The teacher of a third-grader I know seems to have interpreted it as an endorsement of reading logs. As followers of stophomework are well aware, reading logs are a discredited form of homework which often instill in children a loathing rather than a love of reading. Yet so convinced is this teacher of the value of reading logs that she instructs her students to complete them during major holidays, such as Christmas, a demand clearly in conflict with the new policy.

Another troubling area of vagueness is the section on homework in the later elementary years. Time guidelines for these pivotal grades (3-6) are conspicuous by their absence. And the one directive specified namely,’Homework may begin to take the form of independent work’ is so vague it barely counts as a directive at all. I suspect it is commonly interpreted to mean projects, since projects are considered a more creative, engaging form of homework than, say, drill work. This may be true, although, as most parents know, many projects are comprised of arts and crafts-type busywork. Even the most educationally valid projects are labour-intensive, especially when they are assigned as group endeavours, which adds an element of scheduling chaos to the mix. And when projects are used as the principle means of covering the curriculum, as they seemed to be for much of the spring term in my daughters’ class . . . well, before you know it you have temples collapsing and tearful children rebuilding them in dark basements on brilliant spring afternoons.

Conclusion
Which leads back to the initial question: what went wrong? Has the Toronto policy failed to achieve true homework reform? One could argue that my experience with French immersion is atypical, and that it renders invalid any answer I might offer to such a question. But one could also reasonably view French immersion as a kind of microcosm of elementary education in Ontario, a system characterized by an over-stuffed curriculum (the phrase ‘mile wide and inch deep’ comes to mind) and an over-reliance on standardized tests as a measure of quality. In French immersion, as elsewhere in the system, homework overload and curriculum are inextricably intertwined. To paraphrase guest blogger Fred Baumgarten, who has written about this interconnection on his blog Homework Headaches, when you pull at the thread of one, you inevitably catch the other, and the whole overwrought educational fabric threatens to unravel.

But issues of curriculum are beyond the scope of this post. With respect to the homework policy itself, ambiguous language and inconsistent enforcement notwithstanding, I regard the April 2008 revisions as a huge step in the right direction. I applaud Frank Bruni for instigating them.The TDSB also deserves credit for taking the issue of homework overload seriously enough to review the research and change the policy. However, the last two years have taught me some crucial lessons. Policies even well-meaning, progressive ones must be seen as works in progress, in continual need of re-evaluation. More importantly, I have learned that passivity my own in particular is part of the problem. A change in practice does not flow seamlessly from a change in policy. It is up to all of us to remain vigilant and advocate for the the ultimate stakeholders in any educational system: children.

On a recent Saturday morning, my 10-year-old daughter emerged from the basement on the verge of tears: ‘The temple’s collapsed,’ she announced. Though it sounded dire, she was speaking not of an actual building, but of the model of an ancient Greek temple she and a classmate had constructed out of cardboard the previous week. They had piled on the white paint, and the structure had simply buckled under the weight. Later that day I glanced out the window to see my two daughters turning cartwheels on the back lawn while my husband diligently sawed wooden cylinders into pillars for the new temple. It was a brilliant spring day, and soon my husband would finish his task and call my reluctant daughter in out of the sunshine to start rebuilding the temple. What is wrong with this picture?

From the perspective of a homework skeptic, many things: arts and crafts busywork, weekend homework, parental involvement. But the main problem is that I live in Toronto, and my children attend public school in a board which in 2008 enacted one of the most progressive, ‘family friendly’ homework policies in North America. So what happened?

When I read the news in early 2008 that the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) was re-evaluating its homework policy, my heart did a little happy dance. At the time, my twin daughters were in third grade. Although we had not yet experienced homework overload, the prospect of a reformed homework policy thrilled me because the following year my daughters were due to enter mid-elementary French immersion, a program renowned for its heavy workload both inside and outside the classroom. Suddenly there was hope that French immersion would provide a qualitatively (as opposed to quantitatively) different experience for my daughters, with enrichment enabled not by means of extra work, but simply through learning the curriculum in a second language.

The TDSB the largest school board in Canada, serving approximately 250,000 students appeared to have done its homework, so to speak, on homework. Spurred on by parent Frank Bruni and sympathetic Trustee, Josh Matlow, the board reviewed and eventually rewrote its homework policy, approving a new family-friendly version on April 16, 2008. The new policy re-defines ‘effective’ homework, promotes ‘differentiated’ assignments and removes punitive consequences for incomplete work. It virtually eliminates homework in the early elementary years, and mandates substantial decreases for all other grades. But perhaps the most progressive feature of the Toronto policy is its recognition of the deleterious effect of homework on family life. It stipulates that homework should not be assigned on scheduled holidays or ‘days of significance,’ and that ‘time spent on homework should be balanced with the importance of personal and family wellness’

My excitement back in 2008 was not unfounded: this was a good policy.

So why two years later am I complaining about my children’s homework?

In yesterday’s post, I wrote that guidelines issued by the New York State Board of Education provide that when a school requires summer homework, it must comply with a set of rules. But from what I can tell, schools don’t comply with those rules and continue their summer homework assignments as they have in the past.

If your children have received summer homework assignments, or are about to, why not nip the problem in the bud?

Here’s what you can do:

1. Call your school’s principal. If you’re in a state with guidelines like New York’s, ask your principal whether your school will be following the guidelines. If s/he’s unaware of them, offer to send a copy. Tell the principal what the guidelines say. It’s pretty difficult for a school not to follow the guidelines once a parent’s asked about them. After all, the guidelines were issued in response to litigation, and non-compliance leaves the school open to wrath, scrutiny, lawsuits. Get several of your friends to call the school principal as well. There’s power in numbers.

2. If you discovered that your school doesn’t have any rules about summer homework, open up a discussion on the topic now. If you wait until your child brings home an assignment it’s too late. (Of course, you don’t have to make your child do the assignment. And how many children, especially those in elementary school, would actually do an assignment if they didn’t have parental help? Let the school see what happens when parents resist.)

3. Get together with a few of your friends and ask the principal or department head for a meeting. Tell them how summer assignments affect your family. Read a little about the problems with assigned reading so that you can make strong arguments:

      * An

article on summer reading

      in

USA Today

      , cites a recent study by Richard Allington, a researcher and author of many books on literacy. Allington and colleagues selected students in 17 high-poverty elementary schools in Florida and, for three consecutive years, gave each child 12 books, from a list the students provided, on the last day of school. No assignment came along with the books no reading log, no essay, not even an order to read them. Three years later, researchers found that those students who received books had ‘significantly higher’ reading scores and read more on their own each summer than the 478 who didn’t get books. (I’m sure that any school that gave students books from a list of their own choosing would see the same results students who like to read more and, as a result, students with better comprehension, better written and analytical skills and yes, even higher standardized test scores.)

* This op-ed by my co-author and me published in The New York Times four years ago. I think it’s still relevant.

* An article on reading books you like from The New York Times.

Given the pressures most students face during the school year from high-stakes testing, homework, and extracurricular activities, summer should be seen as a time to explore passions, get outside, read for pleasure, hang out with friends, work a summer job (if one can be found), become a little more independent, etc. These are where students learn to problem solve, be responsible, make good use of their time, in short the kinds of learning experiences most students don’t have time for during the school year. And these life skills are ones that will serve them well in the future, undoubtedly more than most of what they learn in school.

In sum, gather a few of your friends and talk to the people who assign homework at your school. Explain why summer homework doesn’t work in your family and why you’re opposed to it. And let me know what happens.

Ahmed ZaidiHomework Helper – The Toronto Homework Policy After Two Years: One Parent’s Perspective (part 2)
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